Shuffling the deck

Sunday. Today is the 55th anniversary of the last show of the Beatles final tour.

It’s still August but the Farmer’s Almanac is forecasting a snowy January and a “winter whopper” in late February. Now there’s something to look forward to.

A new poll in the mayor’s race shakes things up a bit. But most people are still undecided.

From today’s Globe: “Police investigating two homicides; city shuts down nightclub from shooting.” Usually when The Boston Globe publishes a headline reading that way, the city it would be referring to would be Boston, right? This one is about Providence, a city in an entirely different state. Baffelling. But that’s OK. The Dorchester Reporter has the Boston news covered.

Kathy Ryan took black and white photos of the covid-abandoned New York Times offices. Beautiful work.

And MSG has gotten a bad rap. It’s a good source of umami and is perfectly safe. Actually it can have health benefits, as it allows you to cut down on salt. I’m in.

One throat to choke

Saturday. A day to drink red wine and eat crackers over your keyboard.

A major Christian organization has fired its spokesman for encouraging people to consider vaccination. In other religion news, Harvard, in a “milestone of inclusion,” has installed an atheist as its head chaplain. Modern America in a nutshell here.

The Globe Editorial Board comes down on the side of an appointed school committee. They’re right on that. In principle, an elected committee seems more sensible for purposes of accountability and representation. But in reality, and historically as the authors point out, that isn’t the way things actually happen. The elected school committee was a disaster in Boston. The best approach is the current one. Let the Mayor be responsible for selecting the committee members and be then be accountable to voters for the results.

Squatting is big business in Barcelona. Removing squatters is also a big business.

Matthew Gilbert goes out on a limb to pick the best episodes of TV series from the 2000s, the heyday of quality television. I agree with most of his picks. I loved that first episode of Lost. But I was wondering why he didn’t pick the final episode of Mad Men – until I realized that it aired in 2015. Duh.

And Hurricane Ida is heading towards New Orleans, expected to make landfall as a Cat 4 on the anniversary of Katrina. Batten down the hatches.

Transparent as mud

Sunday morning. Hurricane Henri rolls in. (Thats on-ree’ for all you French speakers.)

Here’s a little more on that Facebook Transparency report. First, they tried to cherry pick which information to transparently release. Then, after some criticism, they transparently released the original material. What an ‘orrible company.

Gene Weingarten has some incorrect opinions on food. Apparently balsamic vinegar is “the mark of the devil.” The taste of curry “could knock a vulture off a meat wagon” and cooked green peppers “overwhelms everything with its nasty, rancid presence.” On the other hand, he’s absolutely right about more than two toppings on a pizza, hazelnut in coffee and sweet pickles.

One good thing the pandemic brought us was an upgrade in restaurant tech.

And it was supposed to be a big concert featuring Springsteen, Patti Smith, Elvis Costello, Paul Simon and others. But they only got as far as Barry Manilow. Then came on-ree’ to shut it all down.

When we was fab

Mid-week. It’s Wednesday. Raspberry Bombe Day.

More heat and humidity coming in the next few days. And pretty soon we’ll be complaining about the cold.

Globe headline: “Senate passes Democrats’ $3.5 trillion budget in latest win for Biden.” I’m sure there was partisan bickering going on behind the scenes but this kind of ‘our side wins, ha ha‘ coverage is a big reason why politics is so dysfunctional these days. I would have preferred that the Globe frame it as a win for the country. That might make it easier for the opposition to get on board for the common good.

Michael Shellenberger didn’t leave the progressives. The progressives left him.

The fiftieth anniversary remixed version of George Harrison‘s All Things Must Pass has been released. It was his declaration of independence from The Beatles and it still sounds great. I’ve been listening lately to another Harrison solo album, the Jeff Lynne produced Cloud Nine, released in 1987. This one, I think, is Harrison at his post-Beatles best.

And according to Insurance Journal, younger people are stepping away from the driver’s seat. Insurance, car payments, driver’s ed? Why bother… just call an Uber.

Hands out

It’s a beautiful sunny Wednesday.

Discussions about crime in San Francisco are getting nasty.

Now that legislators are holding on to federal stimulus money to disperse as they see fit, they will have to deal with the special interests lining up for their slice of the pie. And they all want a big slice. Meanwhile, the governor has been allocated only about 5% of the money to apply to strategic initiatives like housing. That’s a shame, says the Globe Editorial Board. I agree.

Rank-choice voting has been dealt a setback after election officials in New York screwed up their vote tallying process. The screw up may not have had anything to do with rank choice but the unfortunate association is now in place. Eric Adams is projected to win the primary but a hand count will be required.

The Apple fitness and watch apps track active calories, exercise and standing as the primary health metrics. Steps are not one of the big three. I always wondered about that as I walked in circles in the living room trying to get my 10,000 steps each day. Now, it looks like Apple knew something I didn’t. 10,000 steps is not really that big of a deal.

And Alexandra Petri considers what a Fox weather channel might look like. Dark clouds, indeed.