It starts with an earthquake

Monday once again. Today’s word is quotidian.

Here’s one more thing to worry about this election season: a refrigerator-sized space-rock, hurtling towards us at more than 25,000 mph. But don’t worry. Neil deGrasse Tyson doesn’t think it will destroy the entire world.

As we prepare for the third wave, the former FDA Commissioner says buckle up. The next few months may be the worst. Check. Also, Dr. Fauci weighed in on 60 Minutes about how easy it was for the president to get infected. Check. And there’s a crisis in chess and it’s all because of the the pandemic. Check.

AT&T might not have the best 5G options of all the carriers. But that’s OK, says the CEO. It’s because they’re so focused on 6G.

Expect a new Springsteen album this week. And a ‘making of’ film on Apple TV. Here’s the trailer. The band sounds great.

And Geoffrey Fowler googled Google and found that it’s getting worse at search (while getting better, apparently, at generating profit.)

Not out of the woods

Thursday is upon us. It’s National Shawarma Day.

There’s new music from Stevie Wonder.

The South Shore is seeing an increase in cases. Marshfield, Hanover and Plymouth are in the high-risk category now, with Duxbury and Scituate not far behind. The death rate in Massachusetts, even with its concentration of quality hospitals, is higher than in surrounding states, which is a bit of a mystery. Nationally, it looks like the US is heading for a third peak. And Germany, Ireland and the UK are also bracing for more cases.

Ryanair is closing its bases in Shannon and Cork, at least for the winter, with more cuts expected to come.

I listened to the entire hour-long questioning of the guy who turned the supposed Hunter Biden laptop over to Guliani and the New York Post. (The journalistic badgering and cajoling made me uncomfortable and reminded me of Janet Malcolm’s writing. I guess that’s just the sausage getting made.) Maybe it’s my suspicious nature, but it’s clear to me that this whole fake laptop story was a plant, probably involving overseas actors. October surprise indeed.

And if some industries are thinking of leaving New York, Big Tech is bucking the trend by expanding its presence in the city. And they’re no dummies.

Return on investment

Wednesday’s child is full of woe. And in 2020, there are 78 days to go.

At 92, Burt Bacharach is still at it.

As the cold weather moves in, outdoor dining can be very expensive for restaurant owners. The Dorchester Brewing Company is making the investment. Now they need their customers to support them. Also, in Kingston, Regina Pizza has closed its location in the Kingston Mall (or Collection, as it’s known these days. A collection of empty storefronts, mostly.) And on Harrison Ave in Boston, Atl├íntico, a new seafood tapas restaurant, it hoping to make a go of it despite the tough times.

Sherrin Woods, my old childhood haunt, is in the news. A Universal Hub post reports that there’s a petition that suggests the city purchase a parcel along the tracks near Dale Street to incorporate into the woods, rather than have it be developed into condos. I’m on board.

I was really drawn in by Rukmini Callimachi’s reporting on ISIS. Her sources and online investigative methods seemed to be perfectly suited to the story. So it’s disappointing to see that a big story she reported for the Times may have been based on an unreliable source. It’s a ding both to her reputation and to that of the Times.

And African Americans for Trump are on Twitter. Actually, no, they’re not.

Lights, camera… action

It’s Monday. Columbus Day.

Michael O’Sullivan thinks Robert De Niro has gone from a raging bull to an aging tool. I guess he must need the money.

Danny McDonald reviews Marty Walsh’s ‘nonrhotic‘ performance in Frederick Wiseman’s four and a half hour documentary on City Hall. Sounds like it would have made a great Netflix series if it had been broken into shorter segments. But I can’t wait to see it.

Veena Dharmaraj and Staci Rubin make the case for more public investment in electric car charging stations in Massachusetts. And speaking of electric cars, a vehicle engineering revolution is underway. Think big skateboard.

75 year old Ian Gillan, lead singer for Deep Purple, is still touring. He estimates that he’s sung ‘Smoke on the Water,’ 2500 times. That sounds low to me. I’ve probably heard it on the radio more times than that.

And a sitcom character walked into a bar. Right away they knew her name.

Who has the pencil?

Saturday. A nice sunny day. Today’s word is pertinacious.

People say New York is over. New New Yorkers disagree.

Is an exam school still an exam school without an exam? You wouldn’t think so but the latest Boston Public Schools plan to bring the most promising students together without a test sounds like it could actually work and be fair.

MA Sectary of State William Galvin has agreed to ease up on the name dropping. Now he has to quit doing those cheesy (but expensive) PSAs.

Fleetwood Mac’s Dreams has hit #1 on iTunes. Van Halen is also tearing up the charts. Roger Friedman wonders, ‘what year is this?‘.

And of all of the countries Donald Trump has disparaged, he may have met his match in… Wales. This could be war.